Is Your Organization Designed to Change?

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Over the past year I have read many books and articles on change, culture, experience, mindset, transformation, and innovation. These topics show up in my social media feeds daily – and each of these books and articles share great insights about why companies should do things differently with wonderful examples of success. In fact, many of you may likely be working towards implementing these great insights and ideas right now with stories of success and failure.  What I do not see in these books and articles is a way to bring it all together to create success in your unique organization. My goal is to share ways I have learned to bring it all together with you.

Let’s start with the first question we need to ask – is our organization designed to change? Organizations that are designed to change continue to grow and flourish when the marketplace and economy make major shifts. They embrace change and find innovative ways to stay relevant. All components of the organization are in alignment.

 

So let’s examine if your organization is designed to change using a simple checklist:

  1. The culture of my organization supports change by encouraging flexibility, adaptability, innovation, iteration, or improvement (for example if an employee makes a suggestion it is considered and many times implemented more often than not)
  2. The departments in my organization are set up to implement changes with little to no interruption to operations (for example integration points across functions and the customer are considered prior to rolling out change)
  3. The people in my organization understand their role in change and act accordingly (for example if an employee gets stuck or needs help we have ways to manage it and to keep progressing)
  4. The metrics in my organization provide insight into the success or failure of change efforts (for example the outcome of the change is clear and measures are in place to determine success or failure)
  5. Insights from change success and failure are examined and actions are taken to improve (for example if a process was not working in the organization it is redesigned to adjust for future change efforts)

Did you check yes to everything on the list? If so that’s a good sign and I would love to hear from you about what is working in your organization and find ways to share those stories with others looking for new ideas for their organizations.

If you did not check yes to everything on this list I would like to invite you on a journey with me to envision a new path for the longevity of your organization. Next week I will post the first of several articles to help you purposefully design and align your organization to change.

Jason Luber